Never Alone Written Review

It is that time of the week when LittleRocket reviews a game it has been playing. Today we offer the opportunity to hear our thoughts and opinions on the UpperOne Games developed game Never Alone. A 3 dimensional side scrolling game released in 2014. Enjoy

Story

Story

Never Alone gives the player control of a young Inupiaq girl who is trying to find out the cause of a severe blizzard. This blizzard has stopped her village from doing things like hunting and she takes it upon herself with her fox companion to find out what is going on. The Inupiaq people and their culture are the main focus in this game. There are even extra videos that explain cultural information in order to add extra value to the player’s experience.

The girl traverses the land fending off a Manslayer, a persistent polar bear and even gets eaten by a whale. The spirits help the player but also at a certain point also bring harm to the player. The story all in all is rich in content and would excite anyone interested in the Inupiaq culture or its people.

Presentation

Presentation

The game has a great sound track ranging from piano pieces that tug at the heart strings to more dramatic music that fits the game’s more urgent situations. One of the other real draws to this game is the art style. It does sport a simple design which at some points works against it however the spirit designs for example or the northern light backgrounds are very nice to look at.

The game does suffer from a few visual glitches. Many a time the characters would disappear off screen or get stuck on an object in their way. This broke the emersion of some scenes.

There is also a narrator who talks over some of the scenes who we thought sounded great and really made it feel like our story was worth telling.

 Gameplay

Gameplay

This is where Never Alone sadly falls short. The controls are a little sticky and take some time to get used to. Sometimes you find yourself having to repeat sections because the character moved too much in a specific direction.

Playing as the fox also can become quite boring. We know that the fox is just supposed to be a supporting character but most of the time all you are doing is moving spirits around for the other player. The detection areas for some places were off at times which would sometimes cause the character to plummet to their death.

Closing

Never alone has a great story to tell. The developers packed in a lot of extra content that the player can delve into to better their experience and understanding of the story. Its gameplay unfortunately holds the game back from being a truly amazing experience.


Strory : 6.5

Presentation : 7

Gameplay : 6


Total : 6.5\10

Quality for Value. Are you getting what you pay for?

Leading up to The Order: 1the-order-1886-listing-thumb-ps4-us-09un14886, a complete playthrough appeared on YouTube that clocked in at approximately five hours. This relatively short completion time sparked skepticism and outrage among many gamers who insisted that a $60 title needs to be longer. Setting aside the concerns about The Order specifically, the situation highlights the bizarre relationship between quality and value in the world of gaming.

When it comes to buying games, we expect certain things in terms of how much content we get in exchange for our money. However, those base expectations change over time.

These days when a $60 game sits on the shelf beside the likes of Skyrim and Red Dead Redemption, it has a higher bar to clear. Not every game needs to be a sprawling open world or offer endless hours of multiplayer matches, but the general trend has shifted in that direction, which makes it harder to entice gamers to buy a title that offers less content – regardless of how good that more compact experience may be.

mirrorsedgeAnother change over the years is the increasing variety in price points. Platforms like Steam and mobile app stores give gamers more choices at lower costs. Short indie games and breezy endless runners aren’t scrutinized as much by consumers because of the lower cost of entry. This shift in expectations has made consumers today more value-conscious; a game being short wasn’t always a major issue. For instance, Mirror’s Edge (now a cult classic) is about as long as The Order. Though the fact came up at the time, it wasn’t met with the “Seven hours? No sale” indignation that we have seen surrounding The Order.

Where do you stand in the debate?

ciao-su  =^.^=

Read the full article and decide:  http://www.gameinformer.com/b/features/archive/2015/02/19/getting-what-you-pay-value-and-quality-in-gaming-opinion.aspx

Rise of the Tomb Raider (taking inspiration from…)

riseofthetombraider

Early in the production of Rise of the Tomb Raider, Crystal Dynamics put together something called a rippomatic to help set an emotional tone for the rest of development. A rippomatic is basically an faux trailer for the game, created before any assets or even a game’s story has been fully fleshed out. It’s a common practice in the development of video games, and is built out of a collection of scenes from movies that help set the mood of the game and give something the team (and those financing the game) can see early on to get an idea of the ultimate goal of the game.

“We look at media as a place to start and give us ideas and inspire us to make something better,” says the Rise of the Tomb Raider’s director Brian Horton. It’s not necessarily that the plot of these films will mirror that of Rise of the Tomb Raider, or in some cases are even particularly good films, they just all feature specific scenes of emotional resonance, or cool visuals that the team hopes to emulate for their own purposes. “It informs the gestalt of what ultimately becomes our own idea. It’s basically a sketch,” says Horton.

Want to know which films made it onto his list?

Read the rest of the article here: http://www.gameinformer.com/b/features/archive/2015/02/18/eight-films-that-helped-inspire-rise-of-the-tomb-raider.aspx

To infinite profits and beyond

Rekindle humanity’s adventurous spirit by leaving the tired Earth to find new fortunes in the untapped resources of Mars in Offworld Trading Company, the economic real-time strategy game from Civilization IV designer Soren Johnson.

Strategic, clean and concise. Still in Development of course but the game itself holds its own in bring a new flavour to the RTS gaming community, which is a hard enough task in itself as it goes up against the greats such as Starcraft, etc.

Like any well crafted RTS game experience, Offworld Trading Company gives you something different with each playthrough which only adds to the in game decisions that could mean a bust or boom for your colony.

ciao-su  =^.^=

Find out more: http://www.offworldgame.com/#news

Purchase the early access: http://store.steampowered.com/app/271240/